Twitter and blogging, an update

16th April 2019

I am having another Twitter break: I have them from time to time.

(And I often get teased for this, and rightly so, as I mention I am having a break and then something happens to get me tweeting again.)

I was going to have one last week, when the further Brexit extension was confirmed.

But then the Assange story resumed and, as it happens, I know a fair amount about that case by reason of blogging about it in 2012.

The Assange stuff, however, should now be quiet for a short period, while the Swedish prosecutor decides on whether to revive the case given that Assange is again available.

I also now have this new blog to play around with, and I would like to post more here. I think I am tired of tweeting (and Twitter tells me I have been on there some ten years, which is scary).

I realise, of course, that posts on here will not get as much circulation as tweets which “go viral” – but, frankly, that may not be a bad thing. You can get into a rut with anything, and perhaps it is time to do more long-form writing on here and elsewhere.

If something genuinely significant happens I will go back on Twitter. But I am bored of tweets, for now, and the atmosphere on there is often unpleasant. People can be so nasty with such ease.

So this post is just a marker of intent: not every post has to be earnest and an event!

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25 thoughts on “Twitter and blogging, an update”

  1. Whatever is best for you David. Twitter is how I stumbled upon you, you’ve made me read more and question it all. Thank you.

  2. Thank you for all the tweets David – quite understand your desire for a break from twitter – keep well – look forward to reading the long and earnest (or not) posts.

    Best wishes

    Huw

  3. I welcome the change of pace from the self-perpetuating frenzy of Twitter. This gives space for thought to develop, sorely needed at the present time. Looking forward to future posts.

  4. I will continue to follow you wherever you post your witty and erudite comments. (At least until Halloween)

  5. I am glad to see you back with a blog in my email inbox. I’ve resisted Twitter – just feared it might take over my life… I like to try to be well informed but not every moment of the day!

  6. Dear DAG (Jack)’if it’s of any interest, I have always enjoyed your blog by email and found your analysis of the ins and outs of Brexit really interesting. Im glad to read this latest one. I have never got on with Twitter. I think I prefer an extended piece rather than a sound bite.

  7. Your wise comments have been the first place I’ve looked most days. Thank you David.

    I’m currently studying for an LLM and my next / final module will be on Brexit: I’m hoping that your book will be around by then.

    Best regards,

    Ian

  8. Interesting move. I haven’t written a blog post for ages and to find a half decent one you would have to look back even longer. It has become even more difficult as the twitter thread seems to have taken over from short blog posts and of course have more publicity opportunities.
    Good luck.

  9. My (boring, niche) expertise is Brexity and it’s exhilarating and exhausting.
    (I don’t have work related public social media – I can’t imagine!)

    I point out factual inaccuracy online and in person now because of your tweets.
    Thank you for putting your head above the parapet.
    Duck down now with all our thanks.

  10. Yep. I think we all could do with twitter breaks and to take a bit more time and space to consider wether what we want to add actually brings anything to the party. Thank you for, unknowingly, challenging my tangents and angles David. Don’t use up your goes and stay sane.

    Simon.

  11. Share your feelings of exhaustion and look forward to some more reflective, longer writings here. Thank you for remaining a good humoured voice of reason in the spikey world of social media.

  12. Despite enjoying your ‘tweets(?)’ I do so agree with you about Twitter.
    But as long as you keep sharing your thoughts I am content.
    They help me retain some sanity.
    Thank you

  13. Is the behaviour witnessed on Twitter a reflection of our real society that previously would have been limited to a rant down the pub?

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